Tag Archive | Meditation

Jail Tales from TriYoga Center of Central Pennsylvania

From our sister center: the TriYoga Center of Central Pennsylvania

http://www.pennsylvaniayoga.com

 

Jail Tales

(first posted 1/17/14)

 

EvalyneFrom the time she began practicing seriously, TriYoga® student, teacher and supporter Evelyne Noel knew that she wanted to take yoga into jails, carving out a physical and mental space for lifestyle choices. Socially non-compliant behaviors were familiar territory—Noel had heard her father’s World War II stories about starting a center in France for delinquent youth. Even though he had vehemently tried to steer her away from the field as a youth, Noel made a career out of teaching socially maladjusted youth, spending 15 years with delinquent youth.

A few years ago she sought out the sheriff’s office in her county, seeking to teach in one of the detention facilities. Jumping administrative hoops, including those that would ensure her safety, she persevered, quitting all other yoga teaching in order to devote her time to meeting paperwork, photo, and clearance expectations. She found support with Offender Aid and Restoration (OAR), an organization devoted to connecting volunteers like herself with inmates aiming to use jail time constructively. After months of persistence, explanations and security clearances, Noel began teaching at a jail in late 2012. She taught two eight-week sessions, and recently returned to the jail for a third session.

From the start, teaching in jail challenged everything she had learned about teaching. Yoga props were not cleared for security reasons; only mats were allowed. In stark contrast to every other class she had ever taught, her classes were filled with background noise. Due to scheduling constraints, noise carried over from the rec areas. At times, deputies, needing to do their jobs, walked through the class. And inmates wanted to talk: about poses, aches and pains or about where to find yoga on the outside. “So we lost the meditation aspect, but gained community, which I thought was important,” she recalls.

What surprised Noel most of all was the women’s warm reception. “That just knocked me off my feet.” The students welcomed her, they smiled and worked hard. They thanked her for coming and asked if she’d come back. Attendance was sporadic, but that never bothered Noel. “It didn’t matter how many students I had,” she said, “It mattered that I had one, because I wanted to hold a yogic space in the jail, once a week.”

As a way to “wrap her brain around what she experienced,” Noel reflected on each class in a journal. Starting today she shares those reflections with the TriYoga community. Installment one of “Jail Tales” follows — check back to read more about her sometimes challenging, yet always uplifting, journey.

 

Jail Tale #1, 2012, very first class

(first posted 1/17/14)

 

Went well given that it’s jail!

Nine women showed up, some very, very rotund, some not very strong and three beautiful blond chicks who seemed fit.

One-third of the class got into the flow in the side of the room that was the darkest. The others seemed to have restless bodies and did not like to keep their eyes shut.

Super on top of it, the deputies were ready: mats in a corner, class list done, room reserved: spacious, connected by a partial glass wall to the central pod where the deputy sat. Deputy said she wanted me in that room so she could see me. Sure liked that idea, really comforting.

I sustained my own flow but not as deeply as usual: the floor was cold and three-fourths into the practice, the inmates in the central pod started cleaning up, piling up chairs etc. Just as we were moving physically out of Yoga Nidra, the deputy yelled in the loudspeaker “Class is over!”

I’ll have to close class a little earlier next week. So…I have new challenges to work with. I’m pleased.

I was startled by how tough these women are. I could FEEL it. They were very polite to me, worked hard, but they unveiled nothing of themselves and I could feel that they were sizing me up. I am going to go the gentle warrior route with them.

Freaked myself out after class though!

Got in the elevator to go down and leave but somehow the elevator started going up! The higher the floor, the tighter the security. I was wondering what I’d do if an inmate got on the elevator from “up there???” The elevator doors opened and in comes a deputy. Never been so glad in my life to see a uniform, I could have hugged the guy!

“Sir, how do I get outta here?” I asked. He looked at me and my great desperation and said “Little lady…” Then he pressed the right buttons and I was SAVED!

 

Jail Tale #2

(first posted 1/28/14)

 

The room with the cold floor was not available.

The deputy tried to put us in an unheated room and I stood TALL—gentle warrior!—and said NO.

We ended up on a noisy mezzanine with a warm floor.

First time EVER I’ve taught a yoga class yelling.

Forget Yoga Nidra, did not happen.

But I DON’T CARE.

Because

The women were glad to see me

Were not as guarded

Asked if they could bring other women

And what was my maximum

I felt that

I had a Mary Oliver BIG HEART

So I said

I could handle unlimited numbers

I KNOW it to be TRUE

 

Jail Tale #3

(first posted 2/18/14)

This yoga is the yoga of It All Depends on the Deputy.

No mezzanine this time as the new lady deputy said the mezzanine was too dangerous. Why, I asked? A fight, she says, a fight and you could get thrown over the railing. I look up at the blue metal railing, little metal see-through squares, and agree that indeed, I could get flipped over but I’d have to be the losing domino at the end of a very unfortunate sequence of events for that to happen. I do not believe that anyone would flip the yoga volunteer deliberately over, but then, I don’t quite grasp the risk factor.

So the deputy sends the women who are not taking the class back to their cells in order to free the central area for yoga. There is some deputy barking as the inmates don’t move fast enough, a threat of practicing transitions tomorrow. Inmates shuffle around, stack chairs, put games away, surely disappointed by my presence, which takes away one more slice of their little social time. I hug my mat, stand yogini tall and try to keep this bucket of activity at bay so that I can deliver a yoga class worth an inmate’s infinite time.

What was the game room becomes the yoga studio. Cell doors are shut, the deputy returns behind her station and practice begins with a return to the breath. Class unfolds with a door banging, deputy footsteps here and there as she makes her rounds and an inmate who has much trouble closing her eyes noticing a bug by my mat. The bug may have in mind the small coffee spill to my right.

“Crush that bug!” she finally orders.

I teach.

“Hey! Crush that bug.”

“I don’t crush bugs.”

I could make ten more statements about that, being yogini, that the bug’s done nothing to me, that she’s a sentient being, that the inmate should go within and close her eyes, that she could watch the bug impassively in an attempt to change her karma about bugs. But I hold my tongue.

“Hey the bug….”

“I don’t crush bugs.”

Her eyes lose all the quietude that practice might have yielded so far. She adds:

“Not even bedbugs?”

I lose some of my poise: “Maybe bedbugs, yes.”

At the end of class, K. comes over.

“Where can I do more of this, I’m getting out next week.”

“You’re getting out? That’s a good thing right?”

“Yes, I’m leaving jail. Where can I do this yoga thing?”

“I’ll get you the brochure of my yoga studio.”

 

Jail Tale #4

(first posted 2/24/14)

 

Today I come in under the smiling vigilance of a deputy who greets me with a “Here’s the Dancing Yoga class!” Gratitudes for his joking.

And today I hold inmate gazes more steadily as I walk into the ward. We find ourselves in the sequestration room. There’s a door, maybe a possibility for consistent silence and stillness.

May I shut the door?” I ask the deputy.

“I’d rather you keep it ajar.”

I like that he has my back. Ajar is a chair. Then, less ajar, with my shoe. During Yoga Nidra, I shut the door gently but feel a stir in the room. Remembering the inmates’ nervousness I announce that all is well, I have just shut the door. Consistent, quiet alertness seems to be every one’s way of life here, just manifests differently.

The room is small, not square and we are very crowded. We run out of mats and I lend mine. We run out of room and I give my spot away. So I teach crunched up here and there, between the door and three mats, right on the linoleum floor.

“Darlin’, can you move your mat a bit?” says I. to C.

“You address each other as Darlin’?” I ask, stunned.

“Yes,” and a smile.

“Well then, me too. You all are my darlins! My Yoga Darlins.”

Truth told, they are. All that woman has that is glamorous, these women have lost. Their grey-clad destitution has not yet been replaced by the clarity of sparsity.

My darlins.

Bed Bug Lady interrupts class again:

“I’m worried about HER.” And she points to one who looks paler than pale for lack of outdoorsiness.

I come over and inquire à la Theresa Shay.

“It’s that cheeseburger I just had before comin’. It’s here, I can feel it!” She points to her lower right ribcage.

“You ate a cheeseburger just before coming?”

“Yeah”

I can go to don’t eat before coming to class but she probably has no choice. I can go to watch what you eat but she probably has no choice. I have choices.

“Lie down right here on the mat, don’t go to sleep now, stay focused and imagine yourself doing the practice with us. You’ll do an energetic practice, it has many benefits.”
I don’t know how much of this she and they understand but I do know that the Darlins value the care and the sense of community.

The first yoga question pops up, a question about using the right breath. I say that as long as they are watching their breath, they are right.

That question becomes the discombobulation of class. They ask if I can bring yoga books in. They ask for homework. We chat a while, they tell me they seldom go outdoors, but that sunrays do wiggle themselves into their cells. Homework # 1, on the fly: find the sunray and sit in it, every day. Give it your face; it is the connection to the outside and to much more.

I tie the loose, but colorful threads that are left of class into a closing.

 

Jail Tale #5

(first posted 3/4/14)

 

“Nope, ain’t gonna take those shoes off.”

I contemplate the shoes: high top, hot pink, shining shoes. Bulky and not flexible.

I contemplate the possibility of a dead end I want to avoid.

“Okay, come in.” I surrender, but when she walks all over her mat with the shoes, I can’t take it.

“Darlin’, the shoes can’t be on the mat.”

“Okay.” She lumbers off the mat.

“I ain’t practicing anyway, just here to look.”

Dead-end ditto.

“Okay then, just sit on the mat and watch, join us when you want.”

She flops on the mat, shoes on the mat but not the soles.

Our gazes cross and she “Okay! Like this!” moves—butt on the mat, feet-in-shoes—off. I hadn’t thought of starting with a twist.

In the end she will stay and watch the session but I learn that shoes come off, period.
P-E-R-I-O-D.

 

Jail Tale #6

(first posted 3/12/14)

 

Those who wanted homework and books have not been coming but others who are not registered have been showing up.

We are consistent in inconsistencies: room changes, student population flux, deputy levels of tolerance and interruptions. In spite of this, patterns emerge. I know the length of pauses between locked doors, I know to meet inmate eyes and nod as I enter the ward. I know to give silence to the deputy as he shifts his thoughts to yoga. And I now know the presence of the one student who has come to all the classes. I know how she sits on the mat, how she works and how she pays attention.
 

Jail Tale #7

(first posted 3/21/14)

 

I come close to the inmate’s mat as she lays on her back, tense and jittery. She catches my eyes and whispers something.

I nod, called to move us into the next pose but then return to her, feeling that I missed something.

“What did you say before? I missed it.” I frown a bit as I come to the ground, bringing my face closer to hers.

“I said, you know about the pain, don’t you?” Her eyes are hopeful; she expects an understanding.

“The pain, you said?”

“Yes, the pain, you know about it, right?”

“I am not sure what pain…”

“Heroin withdrawal, you know about that pain. What can I do?”

I dwell deep into her small brown eyes and say, “You don’t have to move if the body hurts but breathe—breath will help.”

When I return the following week, this inmate had been moved to the drug unit.

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What is Prana?

What is Prana?

By Christine (Citrini) Ware, Ph.D., E-RYT

I was recently aske388834_10150469850622487_1847652528_nd this question by a long-time student. Prana is defined in different ways: energy, life energy, breath. It can also be thought of as qi or chi (concepts from Traditional Chinese Medicine). In yoga philosophy, the two great aspects of existence are prana and cit (pronounced chit), energy and consciousness. Prana, as energy, exists everywhere and in everything. It is the energy of creation and the essence of matter and form in the universe. It flows through subtle energy channels called nadis. The breath is one of prana’s subtle material forms. The practices of yoga are designed to increase prana, by encouraging control of its flow and energy-enhancing (or “right”) actions. Prana Vidya is the knowledge of life energy; in other words, it is the knowledge and the application of this knowledge to control the flow of prana for greater health and awareness. Pranayama is defined as breathing practices that control and expand prana.

Prana needs to be experienced. It cannot be understood through explanation alone. This is the reason that yoga is an experiential practice in which self-experiment, self-inquiry, and self-realization are encouraged. The experience of energy, of breath flow, and of activity (prakrti) are ways to experience prana. We can experience prana and gain knowledge of it by tuning in to our experience of energy, breath, and activity, and more particularly, that which increases our energy, breath capacity and flow (svara), and ability to focus. The experience of prana can also be (and often is) quite subtle. For example, it may be possible to feel shifts in energy using hasta mudras (hand mudras) or subtle movements of the body in meditative states (prana kriyas). One may also be able to experience the subtle or energy body in relaxed and meditative states (as if experiencing an aura or energy field around one’s physical body). Kriyavati, the inspiration for the TriYoga Flows and Prana Vidya practices, is the manifestation of kundalini (universal life energy) via hatha yoga.

In class this week, I encouraged students to experiment with changing their breath pacing and the timing of their flows and movements, in order to experiment with and experience these shifts in prana. For example, it can be interesting to see how one’s focus, relaxation, breath, thoughts, and experience of energy change if one comes to Knees to Chest from Partial Recline (1) synchronizing breath and movements of legs and arms versus (2) when one breathes randomly and brings each arm and leg into the posture at a different time. The practices of TriYoga are designed to awaken, enhance, and control the flow of prana through encouraging positive lifestyle choices (including dietary choices), the TriYoga Flows, pranayama (breathing) practices, mudras, practices which focus the mind (pratyahara, the withdrawal of the senses; dharana, concentration; and dhyana, meditation), the experience of expanded consciousness (Samadhi), and selfless service (Karma Yoga). Prana is experienced more easily when the body is relaxed, the breath is rhythmical, and the mind is calm; this also expands prana.

The mind and breath are interdependent. Pranayama practices are one of the most powerful ways to control and calm the mind. Thus, yogic teachings maintain that pranayama is one of the greatest yogic disciplines because it brings the breath – and therefore the mind – under control. The more one can increase prana through the breath practices and calm and focus the mind, the more one can balance and increase the flow of life energy.

For more information, please study Kali Ray’s Prana Vidya manual (2008). For this article, with the correct Sanskrit transliteration markings, please download the PDF version from our website. http://www.mindbodyservices.com

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE: Dec 21, 2013 to Jan 5, 2014


BacisTYTT1Dec2013-0973

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE

Dec 21, 2013 – Jan 5, 2014

Winter Solstice Practice

Saturday, December 21, 2:30-5pm

with Christine (Citrinī) Ware

 Join in a quiet, centering practice on the first day of winter, celebrating the shortest day of the year and the transition that returns us to more light. The practice will promote and deepen the meditative atmosphere through the trinity of posture flow, rhythmic breathing, and meditation.

 Celebrate the New Year ~ with TriYoga!

Wednesday, January 1, 2:30-5pm

with Christine (Citrinī) Ware

 Come relax, rejuvenate, and celebrate the coming of the new year with a deep yoga practice! During this symbolic time of transformation and reflection on the past and future, mindfully begin the new year, commit to mind-body health, and connect with the Source.

 TriYoga Anniversary Practice

Sunday, January 5, 2:30-5pm

with Christine (Citrinī) Ware

 Celebrate TriYoga on the Anniversary of Kriyavati, the day when the Flows first moved through Kaliji. Through our practice, we will honor and celebrate the Flow.

 Students of all levels are welcome.

For our planning, pre-registration is requested.

 Each workshop: $30

$5 discount for advance registration (paid 1 week in advance)

 ~ STUDENT APPRECIATION ~

if you were a registered student or purchased 2+ Flexibility Passes during 2013, one of these workshops is on us

our thank you to you! ~

Happy Holidays!

 

TYTT Highlights: Basics Dec 1, 2013

TriYoga Teacher Training (TYTT) is a valuable resource to have in our community. Whether one is inspired to follow the path of sharing and teaching TriYoga or just deepening ones own practice, attending a TYTT workshop is invaluable. Through teacher trainings, we gain subtle knowledge and are able to refine how we share this knowledge to be as clear and as concise as possible.

The TriYoga Center of Philadelphia, with senior teacher Christine (Citrini) Ware, was excited to  host their monthly 4 hour workshop for TriYoga Basics interns looking to become certified in Basics.  The workshop was also used by others as a way to  deepen their practice. TriYoga Basics is the first level of TriYoga. In Basics, we learn the fundamentals of the flows including spinal waves, proper alignment, economy of motion (and words) as well as prop use. There are 5 Basics series, of which the interns explored speaking through Basics Water Series 2 Variation 2 and Fire Series 3 Variation 2.  All the interns did an amazing job guiding the whole class through the sequences. Each intern is clearly committed to their process towards teaching and advancing their understanding of TriYoga.  Here are some of the lovely highlights of Sunday’s workshop:

LegLiftsTYTT13Dec1-0802GroupClassBasicsTYTT13Dec1-1060

GroupClassBasicsTYTT13Dec1-1016 GroupClassBasicsTYTT13Dec1-0914-2 GroupClassBasicsTYTT13Dec1-0922HelenaChild2TYTT13Dec1-0810 GroupClassBasicsTYTT13Dec1-0856 GroupClassBasicsTYTT13Dec1-0846

Hope to see you next time!

Postand Photos By: Rebecca Binaka Swinden

On A Mat Near You: Meet Bonnie

BharatiatPianoMeet one of our talented TriYoga teachers, Bonnie “Bharati” Keyser. We asked Bharati a few get to know you questions and here are her answers:

How did you find/start TriYoga? Did you practice other forms of yoga before TriYoga?

I have pretty much practiced TY exclusively since 1995 when I was introduced to it by Paula Sam. I have tried other styles of yoga and experimented very briefly with Iyengar but TY is my home.  No other practice so beautifully combines technique with meditation.  

What are some of your favorite yoga class memories?
My favorite class memory is being in Kaliji’s studio in Malibu when I was there for basics certification. I could hear the ocean behind her voice.  Magical!  My favorite ah hah moments are when I discover I can do a posture which has eluded me.  
What are some of your favorite activities outside of yoga?
When not practicing yoga, I enjoy being outside.  Recently I have begun enjoying hiking.  I love playing the piano but not for an audience.  I haven’t gotten over my perfection issues around my music. I enjoy almost all types of music.  I like knitting and love cats.  I currently have three cats named Lightning, Lakshmi and Kammi.  I love live performances including theater and opera.  I like vegan cooking but try to not preach too much.  People can be very defensive about their food.  I ADORE travel to different countries and learning languages.  
What has been your biggest “surprise” from practicing TriYoga?
I really enjoy meeting different people through TY.  It is wondrously surprising how transformative a consistent practice can be.  I love the constant refinements which come through in TY.  I love that Kaliji truly cares for me and every student.  She is available and welcomes contact.  She says we are all her family.  
Can you tell us a little bit about your approach to teaching?
There is a delicate line I try to observe between correcting and over correcting.  Particularly for new students, they can feel they are “no good at yoga” if corrected too much.  It takes time to develop a trusting relationship with a student so they are receptive to correction.  If I don’t see a student in class for a while. I will try to reach out to them and encourage them to return.  They are usually grateful.  
 
Interview by Rebecca Swinden

A Complete Yoga System: The Branches of Yoga and the Eight Limbs

A COMPLETE YOGA SYSTEM:
THE BRANCHES OF YOGA AND THE EIGHT LIMBS
BY CHRISTINE (CITRINĪ) WARE, Ph.D., E-RYT

Experience the kundalinī-inspired sequenced flow
of yogāsana (postures) synchronized with prānāyāma (rhythmic breath) and mudra (focus).
The result is increased energy … physically, mentally, and spiritually.
This gives the mental clarity to manifest one’s life with greater awareness.
– Kaliji
Image
TriYoga is a complete yoga system. To what does this refer, and how might this distinguish our classes or practices from other yoga classes? There are various ways that I understand and experience TriYoga as a complete yoga system.

Yoga refers to “union” and comes from yuj, to unite or connect; the act of yoking, joining, attaching, and harnessing. It encompasses the union of body, mind, and spirit. It also refers to the system or path by which we may attain complete union with the Supreme Spirit: the union of the individual with the Universal.

There are many “branches” of yoga, such as jñāna yoga (the path of wisdom or knowledge),
nāda yoga (the path of sacred sound vibration), karma yoga (the path of selfless
service/action), bhakti yoga (the devotional path), and haţha yoga (the path that balances
prāna; the path that balances sun-moon; the path that unites āsana, prānāyāma, and mantra –
or posture, breath, and focus). Many yoga classes today focus only on haţha yoga, or on one
aspect of haţha yoga. TriYoga not only incorporates and expresses all aspects of haţha yoga,
but all “branches” of yoga. In our haţha yoga classes, we may focus on sustained and flowing
postures, breath, and concentration/focus, yet the incorporation of music that calms and
elevates the spirit is an expression of nāda yoga. There is also an expression of both nāda
yoga and bhakti yoga in our kīrtan sessions (such as Chant Club). In our pursuit of yogic knowledge, whether expressed in learning about postures/Flows or whether expressed in other ways of seeking wisdom, jñāna yoga is expressed.

TriYoga also incorporates all of the “Eight Limbs” of Classical or Raja Yoga (the royal path).
The Yoga Sūtras are attributed to Patanjali, a sage from a couple of thousand years ago. He
detailed these eight limbs as
(1) Yama (moral principles or “restraints,” such as ahimsā, non-harming)
(2) Niyama (disciplines, such as svādhyāya, self-study)
(3) Āsana (posture)
(4) Prānāyāma (breathing practices)
(5) Pratyāhāra (sense withdrawal)
(6) Dhāranā (concentration)
(7) Dhyāna (meditation)
(8) Samadhi (expanded awareness)

Some forms of yoga focus on certain limbs more than on others. For example, some yoga
classes exclusively teach āsana; some focus on breathing practices; some focus on meditation.
There are also some yoga schools and teachers who believe that one must master each of the
eight limbs in succession prior to pursuing a practice in the next limb. TriYoga integrates
practices involving all eight limbs, for they all point us toward and move us into integration
and, ultimately, union. Of course, if a TriYoga student or practitioner has a particular
propensity or need to focus on one limb more than on another, this is also supported by the
method and teaching.

Finally, TriYoga is systematized. This systematization is expressed in the way that the
postures and Flows are systematically taught from Basics to Level 7, as well as the
systematized levels of Prāna Vidyā practices (incorporating Prānāyāma, Pratyāhāra, Dhāranā,
and Dhyāna practices), and in the ways that practices from each of the eight limbs intertwine
and integrate as one progresses in the practice. There is recognition in this systematization
that it is helpful to have a foundation of an ethical, moral, and disciplined lifestyle to help one
consistently pursue a haţha yoga practice. Furthermore, meditation and expanded
consciousness naturally arise from freeing the body of tension (through āsana and Flows),
calming the mind (through breathing practices, sense withdrawal, and concentration), and
developing the body-mind capacity to remain focused and still. We have all experienced how
difficult, if not impossible, it is to meditate when the body is full of tension/pain or when the
mind is active and thoughts are racing (the “monkey mind”). As complete yoga practices are
pursued systematically and regularly, yoga, as in “union,” is experienced and embodied.

What is unique about TriYoga?

“WHAT IS UNIQUE ABOUT TRIYOGA?”
AND OTHER BACKGROUND QUESTIONS ABOUT TRIYOGA
BY CHRISTINE (CITRINĪ) WARE, Ph.D., E-RYT

What is TriYoga?
TriYoga is a complete method that includes the full range of traditional yoga
practices, including hatha yoga, nada yoga, karma yoga, bhakti yoga, and jnana yoga
practices. “TriYoga is in the tradition of the ancient yoga in that it is guided by the
direct experience and intuitive knowledge that arise from the inner flow of kundalini,
or universal life-energy” (Kaliji).

How does TriYoga differ from other styles of yoga?
The TriYoga Flows are similar to other hatha yoga methods in that they include
physical yoga practices, breathing practices, and practices to encourage
concentration and meditation. They include the use of props and modifications.
TriYoga is unique due to the Flows’ distinctive and systematic sequencing, the
wavelike spinal movements, the union of posture, breath and focus, the emphasis on
economy of motion, natural alignment, and pacing, and the systematized Prana Vidya
practices (the breathing practices, concentration techniques and meditation that
balance and increase prana, life energy). TriYoga is also unique because it was not
created, but rather inspired and guided by Kali Ray’s direct experience of kriyavati
siddhi (the spontaneous flow of asana, pranayama and mudra). Kriyavati (the
manifestation of prana, the universal life energy, through hatha yoga) continues to
guide the evolution of TriYoga.

Why is it important that TriYoga is systematized (and for students to progress
systematically)?
There are a number of ways to approach this question. In terms of learning, thesystematization allows students to learn foundational practices first, progressing as
knowledge, understanding, and comfort with the practices increase. With respect to
the physical body, the systematization allows one to build strength, flexibility,
endurance, and balance over time, beginning with simpler postures and sequences, and
progressing over time. The systematization also allows students in earlier levels to
experience more restful, sustained postures that allow for integration of what one is
learning, while students in more advanced classes experience fewer rest postures and
more “meditation in motion.” In terms of energy flow, the systematization allows one
to feel how energy flows through the body and how the practices increase and direct
energy. This is experienced first in more straightforward postures, progressing to
more difficult sequences in advanced levels. In order to maintain dynamic
concentration and release tension to deeply experience meditation, the body and mind
may benefit from more and more challenging sequences as previously learned postures
and flows become effortless. Lastly, TriYoga is systematized because this is the way
that the practices flowed through Kaliji, guiding the development of the system.

Who is Kali Ray?KalijiPhotoonAlter CopyrightChristineWareKali Ray is also known as Kaliji, Sri Kali Lakshmi Deviji, and Swamini Kaliji. She is the founder of TriYoga, a systematized yoga method with Basics to Level 7 TriYoga Flows and Prana Vidya (the trinity of breathing practices, concentration techniques and meditation that balance and increase prana or life energy), as well as hundreds of hand mudras. Kaliji has devoted her life to sharing the ancient, universal teachings of TriYoga. Kaliji is a swamini from the Jayalakshmi Datta Avadhoota lineage, initiated by Sri Ganapati Sachchidananda Swamiji. He recently conferred to her the honorary title of Vishwa Bandhu (Friend of the Universe). Many students throughout the world have been inspired and transformed by her presence, her mastery of the flow and the ageless wisdom inherent in the TriYoga teachings.

How did TriYoga evolve?
As a child, Kaliji was naturally drawn to self-inquiry and meditation. She would
frequently wonder, “Where was I before coming to this planet? Where do I come
from?” After asking these questions, she would feel blissful for a few seconds. She
had other childhood mystical experiences of inner connection. Then during a break
from college, after meeting a man who spoke to her about yoga and eastern
philosophy, Kaliji fell out of a boat during a storm. She thought that she was going to
drown. As she surrendered to this destiny if it was meant to be, she felt immersed in
bliss. After her rescue, she prayed for the Divine to reveal the source of this bliss.
At that moment, in July of 1975, kundalini (the universal life energy) awakened and
for twelve hours she was immersed in bliss. Five years later, on January 5, 1980, Kaliji
was leading a group in meditation. She shared a concentration technique of energy
rising up the spine. As soon as the meditation began, kriyavati siddhi spontaneously
awakened within her, creating the spontaneous flow of asana, pranayama and mudra.
Moved by the powerful energy and beauty of these flows, her students asked her to
teach what they had witnessed. This later became known as the birth of TriYoga.
Since then, the continuing flow of kriyavati (the spontaneous manifestation of
kundalini through hatha yoga) has flowed through Kaliji’s body while in meditation,
revealing TriYoga sadhana (practices).

What is the significance of the name TriYoga?
TriYoga represents the Universal Trinity that manifests the Divine. “Tri” means
trinity. The Trinity can be found throughout creation. In philosophy, TriYoga refers
to body, mind and spirit. In hatha yoga, TriYoga refers to asana (posture), pranayama
(breathing practices) and mudra (‘seal’ or practices to develop focus). TriYoga has its
source in the triple principle of sat (existence), chit (knowledge) and ananda (bliss).
The trinity also manifests as the three energies of the mind: sattva (balance, calm),
rajas (activity), and tamas (lethargy, stability). This Trinity is ultimately the formless
manifestation of the one Supreme Spirit.

What are TriYoga Flows?
TriYoga Flows is another name for TriYoga’s complete and systematic hatha yoga
method. The Flows integrate flowing and sustained postures (asana), breath
(pranayama) and focus (mudra) in systematized sequences. This trinity practice is
deeply meditative and transformative because it arose out of Kaliji’s direct
experience of kriyavati (the manifestation of the flow of prana, life energy, through
hatha yoga). There are seven levels of TriYoga Flows in addition to Basics. The Flows
are comprised of poses that are categorized into seven main posture groups:
Standing, Forward Bends, Spinal Twists, Backward Bends, Balancing, Inversions, and
Sitting. Since the method is systematic, students can progress from Basics to Level 1
and then to subsequent levels as they increase their flexibility, strength, endurance
and knowledge of the method. Through sustained awareness on all aspects of the
practice, the inner flow naturally emerges.