On A Mat Near You: Meet Bonnie

BharatiatPianoMeet one of our talented TriYoga teachers, Bonnie “Bharati” Keyser. We asked Bharati a few get to know you questions and here are her answers:

How did you find/start TriYoga? Did you practice other forms of yoga before TriYoga?

I have pretty much practiced TY exclusively since 1995 when I was introduced to it by Paula Sam. I have tried other styles of yoga and experimented very briefly with Iyengar but TY is my home.  No other practice so beautifully combines technique with meditation.  

What are some of your favorite yoga class memories?
My favorite class memory is being in Kaliji’s studio in Malibu when I was there for basics certification. I could hear the ocean behind her voice.  Magical!  My favorite ah hah moments are when I discover I can do a posture which has eluded me.  
What are some of your favorite activities outside of yoga?
When not practicing yoga, I enjoy being outside.  Recently I have begun enjoying hiking.  I love playing the piano but not for an audience.  I haven’t gotten over my perfection issues around my music. I enjoy almost all types of music.  I like knitting and love cats.  I currently have three cats named Lightning, Lakshmi and Kammi.  I love live performances including theater and opera.  I like vegan cooking but try to not preach too much.  People can be very defensive about their food.  I ADORE travel to different countries and learning languages.  
What has been your biggest “surprise” from practicing TriYoga?
I really enjoy meeting different people through TY.  It is wondrously surprising how transformative a consistent practice can be.  I love the constant refinements which come through in TY.  I love that Kaliji truly cares for me and every student.  She is available and welcomes contact.  She says we are all her family.  
Can you tell us a little bit about your approach to teaching?
There is a delicate line I try to observe between correcting and over correcting.  Particularly for new students, they can feel they are “no good at yoga” if corrected too much.  It takes time to develop a trusting relationship with a student so they are receptive to correction.  If I don’t see a student in class for a while. I will try to reach out to them and encourage them to return.  They are usually grateful.  
 
Interview by Rebecca Swinden
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